Tag Archives: Apps and Software

Mashable Weekend Recap: 65 Stories You Might Have Missed

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The weekend started off with a bang, thanks to the dazzling opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games. That was spectacular enough to get everyone super-ready for the athletic competition involving our entire planet.

There were plenty of stories about the Olympics, and at the same time, your intrepid Mashable team discovered so much more — happenings in the digital world, tech innovations that felt like they were from a future world, and GIFs, comics and weekend fun that seemed to be from another world entirely.

Best of all, we’ve gathered all those stories here for you, in one big easy-to-peruse package. So take a look at the latest Weekend Recap, where you can catch up with the entire weekend of delightful news and views, right here:

Editor’s Picks

James Bond and the Queen Parachute Into the Olympics [VIDEO]

Please, NBC and IOC, Learn How to Share the Olympics

13 Surprising OS X Mountain Lion Facts [SUNDAY COMICS]

Top 10 Twitter Pics of the Week

Mountain Lion Vs. Windows 8: Which One Is Better?

Best Pics Yet: This Could Be the Real iPhone 5

How to Watch the 2012 Summer Olympics Online

Spoilers: Angry Olympics Fans Tweet Their Protests, NBC Responds

Top 10 Tech This Week [PICS]

News & Opinion

Marissa Mayer Brings Free Food to Yahoo, Eyes Acquisitions [REPORT]

MTV’s ‘Teen Wolf’ Facebook Game Is Feast for Fans in First 5 Weeks

Where to Get Back-to-School Deals on Tablets, Computers

How Dictation Tools Can Help Speed Up Your Workflow [INFOGRAPHIC]

Russian Cargo Spacecraft Docks With Space Station on 2nd Try

Olympic Check-Ins: Hot Foursquare Deals and Badges for London 2012

Record-Setting Electric Plane Flight Almost Didn’t Make It [VIDEO]

Mysterious Billionaire Commissions World’s Largest Yacht [VIDEO]

Twitter Jokester’s ‘Bomb Threat’ Charges Dropped [VIDEO]

Olympic Popularity: Starcount Reveals Which Olympic Athletes Are Trending

Amazon Sales Tax — What it Means for You

Down to the Millisecond: All About Olympics Timing

Trioh! The Flashlight You Can See When The Power Goes Out

On Reddit, Rapists Say They’re Sorry

Latest Apple Ads Take a Turn for the Worse

Why the London 2012 Olympics Is the First Real-Time Games

The 9 Most Important Tablet Mysteries of 2012

Device Turns Eye Movement Into Handwriting

Apple Considered Investing in Twitter [REPORT]

Hidden Genius Project Provides Tech Mentorship for Young Black Men

What Higher Education Will Look Like in 2020 [STUDY]

Why Do We Keep Going Back to Mars?

This Is What the Olympians From 100 Years Ago Looked Like

Shedding Light on Mitt Romney’s Unexplained Twitter Surge

New Leaked Pics May Hint at iPhone 5 Design

Chick-fil-A PR Chief Dies as Company Battles Controversy

Hacking the Olympics Opening Ceremony

Romney Advisor Tweets ‘Follow Friday’ List of Potential VPs

Facebook’s Not the Only One Struggling With Mobile Advertising

Weekend Leisure

This Cute, Cubed Bamboo Speaker Packs Crazy Sound [VIDEO]

9 Nifty Laptop Feet to Keep Your PC Running Cool

Kickstarter Project Is a ‘Smartwatch’ for Your Smartphone

‘Fund Me Maybe’ Is Tech World’s Parody of ‘Call Me Maybe’ [VIDEO]

10 Stylish Onesies for Baby Geeks

12 Pictures of Animals Being Forced to Marry

It’s Official: This Is the Cutest Picture on the Internet

Twitter Doghouse Lets You Temporarily Dump Annoying Tweeps

Top 10 GIFs of the Week

Boys Will Be Boys In This ‘Girls’ Parody [VIDEO]

10 Brits Snubbed from the Olympic Opening Ceremony

You Have Upset The Tetris God [VIDEO]

Sneak Peek: Justin Bieber Teases ‘As Long As You Love Me’ Video

If ‘A Space Odyssey’ Were Remade as a Hollywood Blockbuster

Forget Traditional Tours; Vayable Helps You Discover New Ways to Travel

Listen to Talk Radio on Your iPhone? You’re Probably a Liberal

You’ll Grin and Bear it With This Wild Live Video Stream

Mr. Bean Gets Carried Away During Olympics Appearance

Get a Bird’s-Eye View of 25 Olympic Stadiums

Top 6 Comments on Mashable This Week

Helpful Resources

Everything You Need to Know About Foursquare’s New Merchant Tools

How to Structure Your Daily Job Search to Help Land Your Next Job

50 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed

6 Key Software Updates You Should Be Doing

The Beginner’s Guide to Socialcam

4 Reasons Why Recruiters Should Stop Accepting Traditional Resumes

The Anatomy of a Killer Content Marketing Strategy

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/07/30/weekend-recap-64/

Ancient Cambodian City Revealed in Laser Scan

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Airborne laser scanning has revealed the remnants of a vast urban structure in the vicinity of Angkor Wat, a famous temple in Cambodia. The study, which will be published soon in the journal PNAS, follows earlier research that showed Angkor Wat to have been one of the world’s most complex preindustrial cities.

Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) is making it easier for archaeologists to explore human settlements in tropical vegetation; previous LIDAR work has found evidence of new cities in Central America, in addition to further enhancing the layout of known settlements such as the Mayan city of Caracol.

For the new study, the researchers used a LIDAR setup emitting up to 200,000 laser pulses each second from a helicopter. Amazingly, the entire operation for the data collection spanned just two days in April 2012 for a total 20 hours of flight time, capturing imagery that would have taken many years to assemble from the ground, if at all. The LIDAR analysis also appears to have discovered what could be an older city beside Angkor Wat.

Angkor Wat

A digital recreation of Angkor Wat temple site (top) based on raw LIDAR digital terrain data (bottom). Image courtesy of PNAS.

The study has revealed new canals, temples and still unidentified manmade features, confirming a metropolitan area that housed many thousands of people, much as the Giza Plateau Mapping Project is doing for cities surrounding the Pyramids construction in Egypt.

As LIDAR technology gets cheaper, it will accelerate our understanding of early human settlements from the lingering geographic footprints we left, traces which can be almost as shallow as a footprint itself. As the authors write in their PNAS paper:

LIDAR technology has recently matured to the point where it has become cost-effective for archaeologists with sufficient accuracy and precision to identify archaeological features of only a few centimeters in size.

Image courtesy of sam garza/Wikimedia Commons

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/06/18/lidar-angkor-wat/

How Footprint Recognition Software Can Revolutionize Zoology

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New software can now ID an animal’s gender and age based just on a picture of a footprint.

This is how it works: Key elements uniquely identifying a footprint are marked on an image, as shown above with an Amur tiger print, prior to algorithmic classification.

Studying animal behavior in the wild usually starts with figuring out just where the wild animals are hiding. Field biologists can use a combination of methods for this, such as radio collars, aerial surveys, and camera traps to remotely monitor animal movement. However, to an expert eye, a well-preserved footprint can also reveal a surprising amount about an animal: its species, gender, age, even its individual identity.

The trick is being able to do the identifying accurately and quickly. Over the last decade, WildTrack, an organization founded by zoologist and veterinarian Zoe Jewell and her husband, Sky Alibhai, has been developing image processing software to detect physical footprint characteristics that are hard for an untrained eye to recognize. The organization’s software is being used to track a variety of animals in different habitats, including Amur tigers in Russia, tapirs in South America, and polar bears in the Canadian province of Nunavut.

Jewell and Alibhai call their method footprint identification technique, or FIT. Professional trackers photograph footprints (with a ruler for scale) and add GPS coordinates. The footprints are then loaded into software that allows WildTrack to match them to a large number of known footprints from captive animals of the same species. Algorithms compare elements of the photographed footprint against those in a database of animals whose age and gender are known.

Jewell and Alibhai got the idea for WildTrack while working with black rhinos in Zimbabwe in the late 1990s. It has taken years of tweaking and tinkering to develop algorithms that reliably recognize footprints of a given species.

An ongoing challenge will be FIT’s reliability (it is currently 90 percent accurate at correctly determining the sex, age, and species). Nonetheless the technique is low cost, relatively easy to use, and noninvasive compared to radio collaring, which requires darting an animal. But FIT doesn’t work well with all animals yet, and is still very much in an experimental stage.

“The zebra hoof is a big challenge because it’s hard to mark different shapes. On the other hand, a cheetah or lion footprint, where you have four toes and a heel pad, there’s lots of complexity there, making it easier to identify individuals,” Jewell says.

Image: Jiayin Gu; Jennifer C.

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/08/19/footprint-recognition-software/

52 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed

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It may not have been a good week for Big Bird, but it was a good one for Detroit Tigers infielder Miguel Cabrera, who won the first Triple Crown since 1967. Over the past few days we’ve witness the beginning of debate season and the end of baseball’s regular season.

With all that going on, it’s understandable if you lost track of what’s happening in the social media and tech world. To get you up to speed, we’ve rounded up all our best feature stories from the past week.

The Lifestyle section was particularly active with resources that could help improve your ever-important quality of life. You can also start crossing names of your holiday shopping list with gift ideas such as geeky wine racks, funky iPhone cases and a high-end coffee maker that brews the perfect cup of java.

For you political junkies, be sure to check out our new special feature on how the digital sphere is shaping modern campaigning and elections. There’s also plenty of information regarding social media and business. It’s all here; dig in.

Editor’s Picks

Social Media

For more social media news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s social media channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Business & Marketing

For more business news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s business channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Tech & Mobile

For more tech news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s tech channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Lifestyle

For more digital lifestyle news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s lifestyle channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/10/06/digital-media-resources-57/

65 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed

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Tablet and Icons

Time passes quickly and change is relentless, particularly in the digital sphere. So, if your busy life kept you away from the Internet this week, there’s plenty you may have missed.

But don’t fret — Mashable, your cyber ally, is here to relieve your digital woes. Our staff tracked down every new gizmo, app, game, website and service they could find. Check them out in our weekly roundup of digital resources, below, and then visit the comments section to let us know which stories you found most interesting.

Editor’s Picks

Social Media

For more social media news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s social media channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Business & Marketing

For more business news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s business channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Tech & Mobile

For more tech news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s tech channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Lifestyle

For more digital lifestyle news and resources, you can follow Mashable‘s lifestyle channel on Twitter and become a fan on Facebook.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/10/01/resources-roundup/

What to Expect From Apple’s iPhone 5 Event

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Here we go again: About a year ago Mashable ran a story with almost the exact same headline as this one. In October 2011, Apple unveiled its fifth-generation iPhone to the world, except it wasn’t called the iPhone 5. It was the iPhone 4S, an incremental update that had been predicted, although that was after many months of wild speculation.

Sound familiar? We’ve been hearing for months that we’ll see the iPhone 5 this fall. Except this time it’s the real deal — when Apple sent out invitations for its Sept. 12 event, the shadow of the “12” was clearly made to look like the number five, with the accompanying caption “it’s almost here.” As my colleague Chris Taylor observed, that may not be letting the cat out of the bag, but it’s kind of making the bag transparent.

By all reports, when we finally see the real iPhone 5 (technically Apple’s sixth iPhone), it’s going to be the biggest redesign of the product since Steve Jobs unveiled the first model way back in January 2007. It’s also going to be the most lucrative for the company, if past history is any indication — every new iPhone has outsold the previous by a wide margin.

THE LATEST: iPhone 5 Unveiled | iPhone 5 vs. Competitors | More of iOS 6 | Thinner iPod Nano | iPod Touch With Siri | New iTunes | New iPhone Dock Connector | New Earbuds, EarPods

But what features is iPhone 5 expected to have, and what else will be on deck for the event? Only Apple knows for sure, but based on online chatter, which has converged over the past few weeks, we can make some educated guesses. Here’s what’s (likely) on tap for Apple’s big iPhone show:

The Skinny on iPhone 5

The star of this event is obviously the iPhone 5, which reportedly brings a new design to the iPhone to accommodate a different-size screen. Reports and leaked images point to the new model sporting a 4-inch screen with an aspect ratio that will make the display longer. That would allow for five rows of apps (plus the “permanent” row on the bottom). The supplier is rumored to be Sharp.

Besides the large screen, the biggest new feature on the iPhone 5 will be LTE connectivity. There’s simply no way Apple won’t include this feature, and it’s been all but confirmed through leaked images of the phone’s motherboard and other reports. Add to that the simple fact that, thanks to progress, the design compromises necessary for LTE that Tim Cook used to be worried about have been largely eliminated.

So the iPhone 5 will have LTE, but what networks will it run on? Since there are versions of the iPad that run on Verizon and AT&T’s LTE networks, you can bet solidly on those being included, but Sprint looks just slightly less sure. If it’s so equipped, it will be Apple’s first LTE Sprint product. That said, Sprint just launched nationwide LTE on Monday, so the network is ready and waiting.

There’s been a lot of buzz around Apple shrinking the dock connector on future iOS devices, and it looks like the iPhone 5 will be the first one with a smaller, 19-pin jack. The current 30-pin dock connector is a holdover from the iPhone’s predecessor, the iPod (although the first iPods were FireWire-only). It’s also fairly large as connectors go — certainly compared with the micro USB ports on many of today’s phones — and its imminent replacement is likely a move to ensure Apple can make the iPhone even thinner than it is already.

One feature you can probably not expect in the iPhone 5 is near-field communication (NFC), which can enable mobile payments and effortless “touch” pairing with devices like Bluetooth earpieces (as long as they have NFC, too). While many Android phones now include it, Apple is said to be skipping the feature in iPhone 5. If that’s true, it’s probably because it’s still a relatively unknown (and unused) feature for many users, and Apple’s waiting to put its own mobile-payment strategy in place before including NFC.

Some rumors say Apple will make another dramatic improvement to a long-standing holdover from the iPod days — the widely derided earbuds that come with every iPhone. Apple could replace them with a new vented in-ear design, but there’s not much to go on here other than a patent Apple filed in April this year.

Finally, there’s the on-sale date, which we can say with almost complete certainty will be Sept. 21. When Apple unveils something on a Wednesday, the most common release date is the following Friday (almost every iPhone has launched on a Friday). Since all rumors indicate the iPhone 5 is now in production and about to ship, Sept. 21 must be the day.

Supporting Characters

New iPods: Apple’s September events have traditionally been about the iPod line, and there hasn’t been a significant upgrade to the lines since 2010. The iPod Touch typically mirrors design changes in the iPhone, so there’s a strong possibility of a new model with a larger screen and even thinner design. New iPod Nanos and Shuffles sporting the new dock connector are also possibilities.

iOS 6: Apple already unveiled iOS 6 back at its spring event, but now it’s ready for prime time. Apple will no doubt announce its general availability, which could be as early as today. There will also be some more detail on the features, Siri’s new abilities, and maybe even a small update about OS X Mountain Lion — we’re still waiting for that Facebook integration, after all.

Sprint iPad: Sprint didn’t get an invitation to Apple’s iPad unveiling in the spring, but that was before it had a full-fledged LTE network. Apple could finally let Sprint into the iPad club with a 4G LTE model today, though even if that’s in the works, the two companies might be saving it for another Apple event later in the fall.

One More Thing… Doubtful

That event being the unveiling of the iPad Mini, a smaller-screen version of the iPad. There have been a lot of rumors and alleged leaks about this product, so it’s extremely likely it exists, although most signs say the li’l iPad will headline its own show sometime in October. And the chance of a new Apple TV (either box or actual set) being unveiled tomorrow looks very small.

Still, you never know. Tim Cook could unveil one of those spider-like iPhone 5 wrist creatures. Or he could just walk out, shout “Syke!” and gleefully tell the world there will be no new iPhones this year before maniacally laughing as he exits the stage.

But probably not. As much as Cook promised to “double down” on secrecy last spring, Apple is the most scrutinized company in tech — if not the world — and that’s why we already know a good amount of what the iPhone 5 will be. We don’t know everything, though, and Apple will surely surprise us with a new treat, even if it’s minor.

What do you think it will be? Shout out your predictions in the comments.

BONUS: All the iPhone 5 Rumors That Might Be True

Tour the Solar System with Dazzling Astronomy App

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Have you ever dreamed of traveling through space? Alas, you might never be able to do it for real. But luckily, there’s an app for that.

Solar Walk, an app for the iPad, let’s you explore the solar system in 3D on your tablet. No need for rockets, spaceships or zero-gravity. Now you can see a reproduction of Jupiter’s rings from the comfort of your couch. And it’s not just about exploring, the app has a lot of information on every planet and satellite to satisfy the appetites of the space geeks out there.

You can also plug your iPad to your 3D HDTV and explore the universe in stunning 3D on your TV. All you need is an HDMI cable and an adapter.

Developed by Vito Technology, the app is available for $4.99 on the App Store. To find out more about this exciting app, check out the video above.

Photo courtesy of Vito Technology

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/10/26/tour-space-app/

NASA Uses Photo Filters to Enhance, Study Pics of the Sun

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Gradient filters to boost contrast in photos aren’t just for photographers anymore. Astronomers are using them to take a better look at our sun, too.

NASA scientists say they can apply the photo-editing technique to enhance places of contrast around the sun, making its explosive plasma loops not only more stunning, but also easier to study.

A new video of the sun from the Solar Dynamics Observatory shows coronal loops bursting from the sun. These huge arcs of solar material, which are constrained by magnetic fields, can swirl slowly on the edge of the sun for hours, sometimes even days.

Scientists at the observatory carefully adjusted gradient algorithms to make these coronal loops appear much more defined in the new video, NASA officials said in a statement Thursday. The loops — highlighted in orange and red — pop out next to the more fuzzy areas in the sun’s atmosphere.

Sharp observations of plasma loops can help astronomers understand the sun’s complicated magnetic fields, according to NASA. And coronal loops are of particular interest to scientists because they may be the root of explosive solar flares that can wreak havoc on satellites in space and power grids on Earth.

The sun is currently going through an active phase of its 11-year solar weather cycle and is expected to reach its peak activity in 2013. The current sun weather cycle is known as Solar Cycle 24.

The Solar Dynamics Observatory has been recording high-definition images and video of the sun since its launch in 2010.

This article originally published at Space.com
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/10/22/nasa-uses-photo-filters-to-enhance-sun-video/

Intel Fuels a Rebellion Around Your Data

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The world’s largest chip maker wants to see a new kind of economy bloom around personal data.

Intel is a $53-billion-a-year company that enjoys a near monopoly on the computer chips that go into PCs. But when it comes to the data underlying big companies like Facebook and Google, it says it wants to “return power to the people.”

Intel Labs, the company’s R&D arm, is launching an initiative around what it calls the “data economy”—how consumers might capture more of the value of their personal information, like digital records of their their location or work history. To make this possible, Intel is funding hackathons to urge developers to explore novel uses of personal data. It has also paid for a rebellious-sounding website called We the Data, featuring raised fists and stories comparing Facebook to Exxon Mobil.

Intel’s effort to stir a debate around “your data” is just one example of how some companies—and society more broadly—are grappling with a basic economic asymmetry of the big data age: they’ve got the data, and we don’t.

Internet firms like Google and Amazon are concentrating valuable data about consumers at an unprecedented scale as people click around the Web. But regulations and social standards haven’t kept up with the technical and economic shift, creating a widening gap between data haves and have-nots.

“As consumers, we have no right to know what companies know about us. As companies, we have few restrictions on what we can do with this data,” says Hilary Mason, chief data scientist at Bit.ly, a social-media company in New York. “Even though people derive value, and companies derive value, it’s totally chaotic who has rights to what, and it’s making people uncomfortable.”

In February, for instance, legislators in California introduced the first U.S. law to give individuals a complete view into their online personas. The “Right to Know” bill would let citizens of the state demand a detailed report showing all the information about them that companies like LinkedIn or Google had stored, and whom they had shared it with.

That bill quickly got shelved under pressure from lobbyists for technology companies, who called it “unworkable” and financially damaging to Internet firms and said lawmakers don’t understand “how the Internet works.” Some of the data covered in the bill, like a computer’s IP address, or location, is so basic to communication between machines on the Internet that companies admitted they don’t even know where it ends up.

And that’s the wider dilemma: our personal data is inextricably tied to “big data”—those far larger data sets that now power many of the online services we use. If you don’t tell a navigation app where you are, it can’t tell you where to turn, or tell others there’s traffic ahead. One doesn’t work without the other. What’s more, the economic importance of products fueled with personal data is growing rapidly.

According to the Boston Consulting Group, as methods for basing transactions on a person’s digital records have spread from banks to retailers and other sectors, the financial value that companies derived from personal data in Europe was $72 billion in 2011. The consultants concluded that “personal data has become a new form of currency.”

Yet that doesn’t mean it’s a currency easily understood or traded on by individuals. Although a few startups have attempted to help individuals monetize their personal facts, the truth is that information about people’s identity and habits has financial value mostly in the aggregate. A single user’s value to Facebook, for instance, is only about $5 a year. Mason, the Bit.ly executive, says trying to put a value on one person’s data is like calculating the value of one unmatched shoe. “And here we are talking about sets of millions or billions of shoes,” she says. “I just don’t think that data plays by the economics of any goods we are familiar with.”

Some believe the market may have already found the right economic balance. “It seems like we have a working model where companies own our data and we’re okay with that because of the free stuff, personalization, and convenience we get in return,” says Gam Dias, CEO of First Retail, an e-commerce consulting company. “There’s not a lot I’m going to do with my extra data anyway. I already know who I am and what I want.”

Intel this year judged the questions swirling around personal data important enough to launch a “Data Economy Initiative,” a multiyear study whose goal is to explore new uses of technology that might let people benefit more directly, and in new ways, from their own data, says Ken Anderson, a cultural anthropologist who is in charge of the project.

Anderson, who once helped Apple develop the sliding application bar that appears on Mac computers (after studying how people organized their desks and stacked items on shelves), says Intel believes technology based on personal data may end up in the control of individuals, in much the same way that mainframe computers gave way to PCs. “It doesn’t matter what you look at in terms of technology. Usually, there is this move toward individualization,” he says.

Intel, which has started surveying consumer opinions, has also been supporting efforts like a competition in New York last fall in which developers wrote apps for the elderly and single mothers. It’s also underwriting the National Day of Civic Hacking, an event focused on new uses of municipal data being released by city governments, such as records of health inspections.

It’s too early to say just what kinds of products might result for Intel, Anderson says,. “When you talk about the data economy, it’s really something that doesn’t yet exist,” he says. “There are people who [are] trying to control a lot of your personal data. But that’s not an economy—that’s just profit for one company.”

Image via ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/05/20/intel-data-economy/

You Can Now Use LastPass to Log Into Android Apps Automatically

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The Samsung Galaxy S5 runs on Android software.

Password management service LastPass, which stores passwords on a secure online service to automatically log users into websites, has rolled out automatic password entry to Android apps and the smartphone’s Chrome browser.

So for LastPass users on Android, the days of manually entering passwords into apps and websites are over.

“It takes the concept of our desktop functionality — recognizing what page you’re on and looking for a match stored in your vault — but is adapted for the Android accessibility feature,” Amber Gott, a LastPass spokesperson, told Mashable. “Once the option is enabled in the LastPass Android app, LastPass can now ‘see’ when you’re on an app login page, and then can hover and let you know if you have a matching login.”

The news comes just a few weeks after competing password management service PasswordBox enabled a similar automatic entry feature. Previously, LastPass users needed to copy and paste passwords from the LastPass app to log into native apps and sites.

The feature is available for apps on devices with Android 4.1 and later and Chrome on smartphones running 4.3 and later. It also supports Dolphin HD and Firefox mobile browsers, too.

LastPass Netflix

Although the functionality adds a big convenience on Android, it’s unclear if and when the feature will ever come to iOS devices.

“Unfortunately, Apple doesn’t have an equivalent that allows us to hook into the OS and securely deliver users their data,” a LastPass spokesperson told Mashable. “We’re still looking into it and hope that further updates to iOS may allow us to implement something similar.”

Read more: http://mashable.com/2014/03/26/lastpass-autofill-android-app/