Tag Archives: Pics

See Carl Sagan’s Childhood Vision of Space Exploration

Sagan

Carl Sagan’s passion for astronomy made him one of the most respected and celebrated space geeks of the 20th century. The science legend’s enthusiasm for exploring worlds beyond our own began as a child growing up in Brooklyn.

At age 5, Sagan began frequenting the New York Public Library to browse books that could give him a better understanding of the stars. He later reflected on the what he discovered: “There was a magnificence to it, a grandeur, a scale which has never left me. Never ever left me.” The experience got him hooked on outer space.

Sagan’s fixation continued and as a pre-teen he sketched his vision for the future of interstellar space exploration. The drawing featured newspaper headlines he predicted would happen in the future.

The Library of Congress recently shared a digital copy of the drawing, along with a couple other gems you can view in the gallery below.

The selfie stick has taken over CES 2015

Selfie-sticks

A selfie stick sighting in Las Vegas.
Image: Mashable, Tyler Tronson

If 2014 was the year of the selfie stick, then CES 2015 may be the event where the product hits peak saturation. This year’s International CES is still in its infancy, yet many people are already overwhelmed by them.

When it comes to the selfie stick, you’re either in the camp that loves them:

Or you’re in the camp that despises them, and despises the people who use them:

But no matter what you do, if you’re at CES 2015, there’s a great chance you’ll probably leave town with a selfie stick in tow:

Sip on Whimsical Illustrations of Important People Drinking Coffee

Important people need a kick of caffeine to tackle the morning, just like the rest of us less superior peons.

Illustrator Steven Weinberg offers a look at the java habits of powerful people (and Muppets and dinosaurs) with a quirky series titled “Important People Drinking Coffee.”

Pack the cream and sugar, then head to Weinberg’s website to take a sip of the full series.

Image courtesy of Steven Weinberg

Image courtesy of Steven Weinberg

Image courtesy of Steven Weinberg

Image courtesy of Steven Weinberg

Image courtesy of Steven Weinberg

5 Craters That Look Like Other Things

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Beam Me Up, Crafty: 15 Quirky Star Trek Finds on Etsy

Beam-me-up-crafty-15-quirky-star-trek-finds-on-etsy-bfe467fb1f

Mashable Weekend Recap: 65 Stories You Might Have Missed

Mashable-weekend-recap-65-stories-you-might-have-missed-cab0c8fda5

The weekend started off with a bang, thanks to the dazzling opening ceremony of the 2012 Olympic Games. That was spectacular enough to get everyone super-ready for the athletic competition involving our entire planet.

There were plenty of stories about the Olympics, and at the same time, your intrepid Mashable team discovered so much more — happenings in the digital world, tech innovations that felt like they were from a future world, and GIFs, comics and weekend fun that seemed to be from another world entirely.

Best of all, we’ve gathered all those stories here for you, in one big easy-to-peruse package. So take a look at the latest Weekend Recap, where you can catch up with the entire weekend of delightful news and views, right here:

Editor’s Picks

James Bond and the Queen Parachute Into the Olympics [VIDEO]

Please, NBC and IOC, Learn How to Share the Olympics

13 Surprising OS X Mountain Lion Facts [SUNDAY COMICS]

Top 10 Twitter Pics of the Week

Mountain Lion Vs. Windows 8: Which One Is Better?

Best Pics Yet: This Could Be the Real iPhone 5

How to Watch the 2012 Summer Olympics Online

Spoilers: Angry Olympics Fans Tweet Their Protests, NBC Responds

Top 10 Tech This Week [PICS]

News & Opinion

Marissa Mayer Brings Free Food to Yahoo, Eyes Acquisitions [REPORT]

MTV’s ‘Teen Wolf’ Facebook Game Is Feast for Fans in First 5 Weeks

Where to Get Back-to-School Deals on Tablets, Computers

How Dictation Tools Can Help Speed Up Your Workflow [INFOGRAPHIC]

Russian Cargo Spacecraft Docks With Space Station on 2nd Try

Olympic Check-Ins: Hot Foursquare Deals and Badges for London 2012

Record-Setting Electric Plane Flight Almost Didn’t Make It [VIDEO]

Mysterious Billionaire Commissions World’s Largest Yacht [VIDEO]

Twitter Jokester’s ‘Bomb Threat’ Charges Dropped [VIDEO]

Olympic Popularity: Starcount Reveals Which Olympic Athletes Are Trending

Amazon Sales Tax — What it Means for You

Down to the Millisecond: All About Olympics Timing

Trioh! The Flashlight You Can See When The Power Goes Out

On Reddit, Rapists Say They’re Sorry

Latest Apple Ads Take a Turn for the Worse

Why the London 2012 Olympics Is the First Real-Time Games

The 9 Most Important Tablet Mysteries of 2012

Device Turns Eye Movement Into Handwriting

Apple Considered Investing in Twitter [REPORT]

Hidden Genius Project Provides Tech Mentorship for Young Black Men

What Higher Education Will Look Like in 2020 [STUDY]

Why Do We Keep Going Back to Mars?

This Is What the Olympians From 100 Years Ago Looked Like

Shedding Light on Mitt Romney’s Unexplained Twitter Surge

New Leaked Pics May Hint at iPhone 5 Design

Chick-fil-A PR Chief Dies as Company Battles Controversy

Hacking the Olympics Opening Ceremony

Romney Advisor Tweets ‘Follow Friday’ List of Potential VPs

Facebook’s Not the Only One Struggling With Mobile Advertising

Weekend Leisure

This Cute, Cubed Bamboo Speaker Packs Crazy Sound [VIDEO]

9 Nifty Laptop Feet to Keep Your PC Running Cool

Kickstarter Project Is a ‘Smartwatch’ for Your Smartphone

‘Fund Me Maybe’ Is Tech World’s Parody of ‘Call Me Maybe’ [VIDEO]

10 Stylish Onesies for Baby Geeks

12 Pictures of Animals Being Forced to Marry

It’s Official: This Is the Cutest Picture on the Internet

Twitter Doghouse Lets You Temporarily Dump Annoying Tweeps

Top 10 GIFs of the Week

Boys Will Be Boys In This ‘Girls’ Parody [VIDEO]

10 Brits Snubbed from the Olympic Opening Ceremony

You Have Upset The Tetris God [VIDEO]

Sneak Peek: Justin Bieber Teases ‘As Long As You Love Me’ Video

If ‘A Space Odyssey’ Were Remade as a Hollywood Blockbuster

Forget Traditional Tours; Vayable Helps You Discover New Ways to Travel

Listen to Talk Radio on Your iPhone? You’re Probably a Liberal

You’ll Grin and Bear it With This Wild Live Video Stream

Mr. Bean Gets Carried Away During Olympics Appearance

Get a Bird’s-Eye View of 25 Olympic Stadiums

Top 6 Comments on Mashable This Week

Helpful Resources

Everything You Need to Know About Foursquare’s New Merchant Tools

How to Structure Your Daily Job Search to Help Land Your Next Job

50 Digital Media Resources You May Have Missed

6 Key Software Updates You Should Be Doing

The Beginner’s Guide to Socialcam

4 Reasons Why Recruiters Should Stop Accepting Traditional Resumes

The Anatomy of a Killer Content Marketing Strategy

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/07/30/weekend-recap-64/

Happy Birthday, Grumpy Cat: Today Is the Worst

The Internet’s favorite sourpuss turns 1 on Thursday, and we bet she is extra miserable on this merry occasion.

So how do you celebrate the birthday of a cat that hates everything? Misery loves company, of course. Besides, everyone knows birthdays are actually the worst, unless you’re 7 and theme parties — no, your toga party doesn’t count — are still considered cool.

There is so much hype that comes with birthdays, and it usually fails to meet expectations. So, here are 10 reasons why birthdays are simply terrible — which may just turn Grumpy Cat’s permanent frown upside down.

Happy birthday, Grumpy!

1. Surprise Parties: Good Intentions, Too Much Anxiety

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, jackscoldsweat

2. Most of Us Will Have to Go to Work

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, AVAVA

3. Getting Older Stinks

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, SteveLuker

4. Useless Gifts You Can’t Return … Or Are Just Too Lazy To

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, miriam-doerr

5. Facebook Friends Don’t Even Have Time for You

Image courtesy of Reddit, Vakattack

6. Your Family Forgets to Call

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, PolenAZ

7. Birthday Clowns

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, lisafx

8. No One Shows Up to Your Party

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, mediaphotos

9. People Show Up, But Your Party Is Lame

Image courtesy of iStockphoto, craftvision

BONUS: 10 Terrific Grumpy Cat Tributes on Etsy

Hubble Snaps Photo of ‘Christmas Ornament’ Nebula

Christmas-nebula

It’s the time of year when even the scientists at NASA get into the holiday spirit. Last year, the space agency’s Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer snapped an image of a cosmic Christmas wreath for the holiday season.

Not be outdone, the venerable Hubble Space Telescope delivered holiday cheer in the form of this image of NGC 5189, a nebula that — if you’re brimming over with holiday cheer or just squinting a little — resembles a very merry Christmas ornament wrapped in a festive ribbon.

You can take a trip through the cosmos to zoom in on the nebula just like the Hubble did in the short video below.

Is the “ornament” interpretation meeting astronomers — and we suspect NASA’s PR wonks — more than halfway? Yeah, probably a little more than half, but come on — ’tis the season. You can afford to be that generous, right?

Either way, we can all agree that the beauty of the image on its own is enough to make you smile.

Image courtesy of NASA

This article originally published at Geekosystem
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/12/19/christmas-ornament-nebula/

Aghast Over Beijing’s Pollution? Look at Pittsburgh 60 Years Ago

China-pollution

The photographs and measurements coming out of Beijing these days are horrifying. You can see the brown clouds from space, and Chinese media have even been talking up the problem.

I’ve heard from some Americans saying, “Why don’t they do something about this? How can they live like this?” Etcetera. To an early 21st century American, particularly one living in northern California or a relatively pollution-free Washington, DC, it seems crazy to live with such bad air.

But it was not always so.

As America became an industrial power during the 19th century, Pittsburgh emerged as the seat of metalworking, iron and then steel. This was a city powered by coal. Soot and smoke covered the city. There was no blue sky. Travelers from around the world visited Pittsburgh to see the wonder of American capitalism. The stories they tell are like — exactly, like — the ones you hear today about China. (This is a story that I covered in some detail in my book.)

A wry southerner observed, “If a sheet of white paper lie upon your desk for half an hour you may write on it with your finger’s end through the thin stratum of coal dust that has settled upon it during that interval.”

Another traveler recounted, “Every body who has heard of Pittsburgh knows that it is the city of perpetual smoke, and looks as if it were built above the descent to ‘the bottomless pit,'” that is to say, hell. And yet, this dirty power also happened to make a lot of people a lot of money. It was said, “He whose hands are the most sooty handles the most money, and it is reasonable to infer is the richer man.”

Everyone knew that the smoke covering their homes and clothes and trees was bad. But it made a certain group of people a lot of money. And so they fought pollution controls. And those people had friends.

So, while the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (granted, a less august institution back then) declared the health hazards of smoke and wondered aloud whether corporations should be allowed to produce what it called such “evil,” a Pittsburgh doctor maintained that soot and smoke “only go throat-deep” and said that fire and smoke “correct atmospheric impurities.”

The politics of how this works are pretty simple. The smoke and the soot are something we recognize now as an externality. A cost of doing business that the business doesn’t have to pay because they can dump it on society. Chinese citizens and activists and assorted air-breathers will have to get the polluting companies to internalize these costs. The polluting companies don’t want to internalize that cost. Here’s Chicago’s smoke inspector (yes htere was such a title and in this case, he was named F.U. Adams) in 1896 laying out the rhetorical positions of the two camps:

Viewed from the standpoint of the Smoke Inspector, the 1,600,000 people of Chicago are divided into two classes—First, those who create a smoke nuisance; Second, those who are compelled to tolerate a smoke nuisance. One class has radical champions who maintain that smoke is an irrepressible necessity; a concomitant of the commercial and manufacturing supremacy of Chicago; that smoke not only is not unhealthy, but that it is an actual disinfectant, and that the low death rate of the city can be largely attributed to the prevalence of smoke; that the smoke ordinance and its enforcement are aimed at the interests of the Illinois coal operators; that the advocates of smoke abatement are visionary sentimentalists, and in a general way they are emphatically opposed to any agitation on the subject.

The other side has partisans no less radical, and equally emphatic in voicing the story of their wrongs. They declare that the enforcement of the smoke ordinance is a farce; they demand that soft coal be excluded from the city; they insist that its consumption entails an annual damage greater than the difference in cost between soft and hard coal; they declare that the smoke nuisance is a positive menace to the health of citizens, that it has resulted in an alarming increase in throat, lung and eye diseases; they point to ruined carpets, paintings, fabrics, the soot-besmeared facades of buildings and to a smoke-beclouded sky, and demand that the Smoke Inspector do his plain duty under the law.

It is impossible to reconcile the radical partisans of these two classes. It is fortunate that not many of our citizens are so radical on either side of this most important question. There exists a growing contingent, around which is crystallizing a sentiment that it is practical and possible to abate the smoke nuisance without endangering the stupendous interests involved. The most intelligent and active members of this contingent are drawn from the ranks of those formerly largely responsible for the smoke nuisance. They now oppose smoke for the same reason that they once defended it.

They have made the discovery that it is cheaper to abate a smoke nuisance than to maintain one. And by reason of this discovery the smoke nuisance in Chicago will be a relic of the past before the close of the present century.

Ah, you beautiful visionary sentimentalists! My asthma thanks you. But man, F.U. Adams was optimistic. Change takes a long time. Pittsburgh, for its part, did not enact smoke controls until 1946! Yes, 1946! And they didn’t really get a handle on the smoke problem until well into the 1950s. That’s, oh, 120 years after all those travelers decried the place as hell with the lid off. I mean, this is what Pittsburgh looked like at noon, the lights all on because so little sunlight could penetrate the pollution:

This is what passed for fresh air.

Until finally, one day, after a century of agitation, activists got smoke control measures passed. The sky started to clear.

The fundamental struggle of any kind of pollution control is trying to get the polluters to internalize the costs of their pollution. Because if they don’t, the rest of us have to pay more. We — i.e. all of society — subsidize their businesses through increased health care costs, declining values of certain kinds of housing, toxic land or water or air. And the only reason they get away with it is that tracing the line of causality back to them — even when the air looks as disgusting as it does in these photographs — is just that difficult. They hide their roles in the complexity of the system.

So, next time you see one of the photos of Beijing’s pollution and say, “Geez! The Chinese should do something about this!” Just know that it took American activists over a century to win the precise same battle, and that they’re losing a similar one over climate change right this minute.

Image courtesy of NASA

This article originally published at The Atlantic
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/01/16/beijing-pollution-pittsburgh/

The Internet, Chairs Pose for Eastwooding Photos

The-internet-chairs-pose-for-eastwooding-photos-7f7ddb3a46

Eastwooding has taken over the interwebz — and there are pictures to prove it.

Fans of the meme posted photos of empty chairs alongside the hashtag #eastwooding, which was inspired by actor Clint Eastwood’s ten-minute chat with a chair at the Republican National Convention. The chair, an “invisible Obama” was meant to be a stand-in for the president.


While some photos simply feature fingers pointing to empty chairs, others get a bit more creative.

One pic, tweeted by @RunBoris, shows a man sitting at a dinner table, his arm presumably around the invisible shoulders of invisible Obama next to him.

Another photo, tweeted by @Neckelhead, shows a young toddler sitting on an empty chair — or rather, on the president’s lap.

What do you think of these #eastwooding photos? Have you taken any? Tell us in the comments below.

Photo wall courtesy of Slidechute