Tag Archives: Tech

Screens: Coming to a City Block Near You

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Many of us spend several hours of the day face-down into our laptops. We navigate our cities and communities from the control panels of our smartphones. And at the end of the day, we cozy up with our flat screens or e-readers.

Although some people fight mankind’s preoccupation with and dependency on screen technology, it’s safe to say, the jig is up. We’re hooked.

And today’s major cities have begun not only to accept our gadget obsession, but to encourage it.

It doesn’t matter where you travel, these days. Where there’s electricity, there will be screens — waiting, encouraging and urging your interaction. Head out on the highway (so to speak) and you’ll encounter digital billboards, perfectly alternating advertisements to the flow of traffic. Take a brave trip to New York City’s Times Square, where you can interact with 40-foot-tall augmented reality LED displays. Hop in a TV-outfitted taxi and head out shopping, where store clerks await with mobile credit card readers attached to their iPads.

In fact, digital marketing strategies prove so successful that cities are integrating like-minded technology into their very infrastructures, whether through information services, artistic programs or transportation improvements.

No matter how long you’ve lived in a community, it’s next to impossible to memorize every bus route, subway stop and train schedule. And let’s not even get started on traffic detours.

Companies like Urbanscale aim to seamlessly integrate city services and information into interactive displays throughout cities. In partnership with Nordkapp, Urbanscale developed the concept for Urbanflow touchscreen stations, which appear like giant smartphones and beckon city dwellers and tourists with targeted city maps. But they’re far from limited to walking directions alone; the stations share hyperlocal services and ambient data, such as traffic density and air quality reports. Local experts can even contribute their own input and knowledge of the surrounding area, making for a rich digital stockpile of up-to-date information.

While solutions like Urbanflow provide information for a wide range of location-specific issues, many cities have opted for a more targeted approach, specifically, for improvements in transportation.

Developed by MIT SENSEable City Lab, EyeStop represents the cutting edge in “smart urban furniture.” The concept looks like a futuristic bus stop, complete with efficient and easy to read e-ink message boards, weather alerts and even email access. Powered by sunlight, the unit’s environmental sensors would also detect air pollutants and weather changes. Plus, the EyeStop glows at different intensities as nearby buses approach.

Prudence Robinson, partner strategist and research fellow at SENSEable City Lab, explains why the team chose certain design features for the EyeStop. “Parametric design has been foreseen so that every shelter perfectly fits its site,” she says, “maximizing sunlight exposure for photovoltaic cells and providing adequate shading to the users.”

While some cities are implementing completely new and innovative systems, others are looking to upgrade to intuitive tablet technology already ubiquitous in everyday life. New York City launched a pilot program to replace 250 nearly obsolete pay phones with tablet screens that provide information on local attractions, city maps, public transit updates and even Wi-Fi.

And mobile credit card payment service Square proposed that the New York City Taxi & Limousine Commission embed iPads into 30 of its cabs. Not surprisingly, the tablets would also be equipped with Square technology, which would enable passengers to pay with credit card, sign the screen with their fingers and even email the receipt to themselves.

But screen technology doesn’t always necessitate strict utility. A huge priority for many cities is public art that demonstrates aestheticism and usefulness.

Take MIT’s Light Bridge Project, composed of Panasonic Electric Works’ NaPiOn infrared motion/proximity sensors. The sensors activate colorful LED lights that interact with pedestrian movement. Depending on the type and amount of traffic, the lights alternate between different programs of patterns and colors, using proximity sensors, cameras, buttons, microphones and mobile phones. The project’s aim is to marry traditional lighting concepts with reactive urban screen solutions.

Increasingly, artists are also finding inspiration in digital. At this year’s Philadelphia International Flower Show, creative media agency Klip Collective partnered with GMR Design to design and build an ethereal “wave wall,” essentially a giant sloping dome of screens. On it, they projected a “calming display of undulating projection waves of sea creatures and flower blossoms.” Nearby, a Hawaiian temple featured multidimensional video-mapped animations that taught curious visitors about Pele, Hawaii’s female fire god.

But what happens when an artist requires a colossal canvas? (No, we’re not talking murals.) Increasingly, multimedia artists are turning to available city infrastructure to project their visions. And they’re not thinking small, that’s for sure.

In New York City, artists are using video mapping technology to project multidimensional scenes and characters onto skyscrapers, often using nothing more than a laptop, a portable generator and a projector. When passers-by spot giant dancing monkeys on the side of a wall, they instantly react — and sometimes interact, mimicking the animated movements. Furthermore, the contours and crannies of a building are far from a hindrance — they actually contribute to the 3D effect, as if an image were leaping off the “screen.”

Video mapping and projection technology are mobilizing large groups of people to get to know their surroundings. Some installations even encourage spectators to interact with these large-scale screens as if they were games. People in Lyon, France, celebrate the Festival of Lights with an installation called “The Urban Flipper,” a type of digital graffiti, which when projected on the side of a theater, creates a giant, interactive game of pinball.

In the Netherlands, 3D mapping company NuFormer debuted what it calls “mocapping,” a combination of 3D video mapping projection and live motion capture technology. It projects animated light onto a rectangular building, effectively transforming the structure into a futuristic spaceship-like scene. What’s more, the character in the scene asked questions of and responded to spectators. Thus, each performance was different.

Some video mapping art even seeks to change the perception of architecture itself, as if a building were made of hundreds of moving television screens. The following video shows how design collective URBANSCREEN created optical illusions in the “sails” of the Sydney Opera House. Motion graphics are projected onto the white surfaces, which dimple with movement like actual sails. It’s the festival’s most public event, inspiring attendees and visitors citywide.

Whether to inspire or educate, cities around the world are implementing smart screens for tech-eager residents. Hopefully, they’ll encourage us to take a breather from our self-isolating smartphones and tablets for a moment to interact with the communities and residents around us.

Have you encountered public screens, whether introduced by city governments or artists? How is your city welcoming the latest in responsive screen technology?

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/09/12/urban-screens/

Government Lab Reveals Quantum Internet Operated for 2 Years

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One of the dreams for security experts is the creation of a quantum Internet that allows perfectly secure communication based on the powerful laws of quantum mechanics.

The basic idea here is that the act of measuring a quantum object, such as a photon, always changes it. So any attempt to eavesdrop on a quantum message cannot fail to leave telltale signs of snooping that the receiver can detect. That allows anybody to send a “one-time pad” over a quantum network which can then be used for secure communication using conventional classical communication.

That sets things up nicely for perfectly secure messaging known as quantum cryptography and this is actually a fairly straightforward technique for any half decent quantum optics lab. Indeed, a company called ID Quantique sells an off-the-shelf system that has begun to attract banks and other organisations interested in perfect security.

These systems have an important limitation, however. The current generation of quantum cryptography systems are point-to-point connections over a single length of fibre, So they can send secure messages from A to B but cannot route this information onwards to C, D, E or F.

That’s because the act of routing a message means reading the part of it that indicates where it has to be routed. And this inevitably changes it, at least with conventional routers. This makes a quantum Internet impossible with today’s technology

Various teams are racing to develop quantum routers that will fix this problem by steering quantum messages without destroying them. We looked at one of the first last year. But the truth is that these devices are still some way from commercial reality.

Today, Richard Hughes and his team at Los Alamos National Labs in New Mexico reveal an alternative quantum Internet, which they say they’ve been running for two and half years. Their approach is to create a quantum network based around a hub and spoke-type network. All messages get routed from any point in the network to another via this central hub.

This is not the first time this kind of approach has been tried. The idea is that messages to the hub rely on the usual level of quantum security. However, once at the hub, they are converted to conventional classical bits and then reconverted into quantum bits to be sent on the second leg of their journey.

So as long as the hub is secure, then the network should also be secure.

The problem with this approach is scalability. As the number of links to the hub increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to handle all the possible connections that can be made between one point in the network and another.

Hughes and co say they’ve solved this with their unique approach which equips each node in the network with quantum transmitters—ie lasers—but not with photon detectors which are expensive and bulky. Only the hub is capable of receiving a quantum message (although all nodes can send and receiving conventional messages in the normal way).

That may sound limiting but it still allows each node to send a one-time pad to the hub which it then uses to communicate securely over a classical link. The hub can then route this message to another node using another one time pad that it has set up with this second node. So the entire network is secure, provided that the central hub is also secure.

The big advantage of this system is that it makes the technology required at each node extremely simple—essentially little more than a laser. In fact, Los Alamos has already designed and built plug-and-play type modules that are about the size of a box of matches. “Our next-generation [module] will be an order of magnitude smaller in each linear dimension,” they say.

Their ultimate goal is to have one of these modules built in to almost any device connected to a fibre optic network, such as set top TV boxes, home computers and so on, to allow perfectly secure messaging.

Having run this system now for more than two years, Los Alamos are now highly confident in its efficacy.

Of course, the network can never be more secure than the hub at the middle of it and this is an important limitation of this approach. By contrast, a pure quantum Internet should allow perfectly secure communication from any point in the network to any other.

Another is that this approach will become obsolete as soon as quantum routers become commercially viable. So the question for any investors is whether they can get their money back in the time before then. The odds are that they won’t have to wait long to find out.

Image via iStockphoto, muratkoc

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/05/06/government-lab-quantum-internet/

Google Glass Will Have Automatic Picture-Taking Mode

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project-glass-demo-600Google co-founder Sergey Brin revealed one of the features of Google Glass — the upcoming headset/eyewear device the search giant is developing — in an email to followers today.

Copying a post he had shared to followers of Project Glass on Google+, Brin said he was trying out a new feature of the product that automatically takes a photo every 10 seconds. Brin said he had the mode engaged while he was driving in Montana, with the device sending all the pics to his Google+ account via instant upload.

Browsing the images later, Brin picked one he thought best captured the beauty of the Montana landscape. The image has just 512 x 384 resolution — less than a megapixel — though that that’s probably not an indication of Google Glass’s capabilities. It could be an aspect of the auto-photo mode, using lower resolutions so storage isn’t taxed that much. Here’s the photo:

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In the message, Brin emphasized that Glass allowed him to take pictures as he drove without distraction. He also talked about the vision of Project Glass. “We started Project Glass believing that, by bringing technology closer, we can get it more out of the way,” he wrote. “Whether you’re exploring a new city, hiking in the woods, or playing with your kids — Glass allows you to enjoy and share life’s moments without being tied down by technology.”

It appears only attendees of Google I/O who signed up for Google Glass received the email. On the Google+ post, however, Brin encourages followers to leave a comment and provide feedback on the project. He also promises that Google has some “great things” coming the next few months. He’ll have a tough time topping his spectacular skydive at the I/O conference.

Although it was first reported Google Glass would go on sale before the end of 2012, Brin himself has said it’ll be ready for consumers by 2014. Developers who were interested in receiving one of the prototypes were asked to commit to paying $1,500 for each one, though that figure has no bearing on what the retail price will be.

What do you think of the latest news about Google Glass? Does automatic picture taking sound like a feature you’d use? Share your thoughts in the comments.

BONUS: The Long and Winding Road to a True Heads-Up Display

Nokia Announces Windows Phone 8 Version of City Lens App

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After coming out of beta last week, Nokia‘s augmented reality app, Nokia City Lens, is due for another update with plenty of new features.

The upcoming Windows Phone 8 version of the app, which will work on Nokia’s Lumia 920 and 820 smartphones, is set to debut 3D icons, as well as the option of filtering search results to only show those in your line of sight.

Some WP8-specific features will also be added to the app, including the ability to pin to start any category, and to customize the menu by adding your favorite searches.

Perhaps most importantly, the app will work in both landscape and portrait modes.

Nokia has yet to comment on the exact release date of its newest version of City Lens.

Would you download the app? Tell us in the comments below.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/09/11/nokia-city-lens-windows-8/

Google to Launch New Devices, Android 4.2 at Oct. 29 Event

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Google will unveil several new devices and a software update at its scheduled Oct. 29 press event, according to a company video leaked from an all-hands meeting.

The Next Web is reporting Google has distributed an internal video that details and confirms speculations about what might be revealed at the upcoming event.

The video reportedly discusses the launch of a 32GB version of the Nexus 7 tablet, as well as one with 3G support. It also indicates Google is working with manufacturer Samsung to release a 10-inch tablet called “Nexus 10” that will run Android 4.2 (“Key Lime Pie”), and a Nexus smartphone manufactured by LG.

Meanwhile, the new Android 4.2 mobile operating system will include a panoramic camera option and “tablet sharing” capabilities, which would allow more than one user to access the device with his own set of email and apps — similar to how a family or business can switch between user settings on a Windows computer.

Earlier this week, Google sent invitations to the press for an Android event to be held in New York City. Although the invitation didn’t detail what might occur, the tagline — “the playground is open” — suggests it will have to do with Google Play, the company’s newly-rebranded Andriod Market.

The news came as Microsoft prepares for its Windows Phone 8 launch event, which will also be held on Oct. 29 — and Apple gears up to unveil its rumored 7.85-inch iPad on Tuesday, Oct. 23.

Google’s new Samsung tablet is reportedly being filed under the name “Codename Manta.” The device is expected to have a 2560×1600 pixel resolution and 300ppi, which is greater than the iPad’s 264ppi.

Meanwhile, the 4.7-inch Nexus smartphone manufactured by LG is said to tout a quad-core 1.5 GHz Qualcomm APQ8064 Snapdragon processor, a 1280×768 display, 2GB of RAM and 16GB storage.

BONUS: 10 Free Android Apps You’ll Use Every Day

Top 10 Tech This Week

Top-10-tech-this-week-942835b68bTop 10 Tech is presented by Chivas. Access a world of exclusive insider benefits – private tastings, special events and the chance to win a trip for you and three friends to the Cannes Film Festival. Join the Brotherhood.

Announcing the Nominees in Mashable’s 2012 Innovation Index

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Mashable’s Innovation Index celebrates recent tech, digital and social innovations that have redefined your world. It is comprised of 15 categories, each of which is curated by an expert Mashable selected because of their work in the space. Each curator will select five nominees — companies, products, events or technologies — that are pushing the boundaries in an ever-evolving digital landscape. Once we announce the five nominees, we’re looking to you, the Mashable community, to cast your vote for your favorites, the things that have truly changed your world.

Head over to the Innovation Index to cast your vote!

The nominees are listed below. Voting begins today and runs through December 10, when we announce the winner of each category. You can vote every day throughout the voting period, and be sure to tell your friends that you voted!

Media: Sree Sreenivasan, Chief Digital Officer of Columbia University

Home: Martha Stewart, Entrepreneur

Gadgets: Lance Ulanoff, Editor-in-Chief of Mashable

Shopping: Stacy London, Founder of Style for Hire and Host of What Not to Wear

Social Good: Adam Braun, Founder of Pencils of Promise

Art & Design: Jess Lee, CEO and Co-Founder of Polyvore

Politics & Government: Chris Hughes, Editor-in-Chief of The New Republic

Food: Lorena Garcia, Chef

Business: Alexandra Wilkis Wilson, Co-Founder of Gilt Groupe

Entertainment: Jon M. Chu, Filmmaker & Founder of DS2DIO

Travel: Rafat Ali, Founder of Skift

Productivity: Brett Terpstra, Podcaster and Hacker for Usefulness

Fashion: Coco Rocha, Model

Health & Fitness: Sarah Robb O’Hagan, President, Equinox

Sports: Jon Dube, GM of CBS Fantasy Sports

*Chris Hughes is an investor in the companies noted with an asterisk

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/11/27/innovation-index-nominees/

These Glasses Let You Play in 3D Virtual Worlds

Despite the endless gaming and interactive potential of augmented reality, the technology has been moving slow in terms of widespread awareness and adoption. But a new system called castAR aims to push augmented reality into the mainstream, starting with a Kickstarter campaign that launched Monday.

Founded by veteran developers and former Valve employees Jeri Ellsworth and Rick Johnson, Washington-based company Technical Illusions is offering a product that delivers both augmented-reality and virtual-reality experiences.

First introduced in May as a prototype, the castAR system is centered around a pair of glasses that house two micro-projectors over each lens. Each projector receives its video stream via an HDMI connection, and then beams a portion of a 3D image to a flat surface made out of retro-reflective sheeting material.

Situated between two the two lenses is a small camera that scans the surface for infrared markers. This dynamic allows the castAR to accurately track your head movements in relation to the holographic representations on the surface.

The product also comes with a clip-on attachment that allows the wearer to experience private augmented reality, layering virtual objects onto the real world, or virtual reality, during which all the imagery you see is computer-generated. Also included is a device called a Magic Wand that serves as a 3D input device and joystick.

Some of the potential applications for the castAR system include board games, flight simulators and first-person shooters; but the developers believe that it could also be used for interactive presentations in business.

While many companies have promised to deliver impressive augmented-reality experiences, video of the commercial version of the castAR (above) is impressive. “It’s gonna deliver on the dream of the holodeck,” Bre Pettis, CEO of Makerbot, said in the video.

For $355, early adopters can get their hands on the entire package of components, which includes the castAR glasses, the retro-reflective surface, the Magic Wand and the AR and VR clip-on. There are also several other packages offered at lower prices for those only looking to try the basics of the system.

Launched with a goal of $400,000, the team’s Kickstarter campaign has already earned over $210,000 as of this writing. Those who order the device now can expect to get it next September, according to Technical Illusions.

Image: Technical Illusions

Read more: http://mashable.com/2013/10/14/augmented-reality-glasses/

Google Internet Service May Actually Bring U.S. Up to Speed

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Google’s effort to install a blazingly fast, gigabit-per-second fiber Internet service in the two-state metropolis of Kansas City — a speed 100 times faster than the national average — is a radical new business direction for the company, and perhaps provides an unorthodox model for how to rewire parts of the United States.

At one level, the project reflects Google’s desire to keep developing new businesses by giving people ultrafast speeds and then offering experimental services like Google TV. But if Google’s business model for actually getting fiber built pans out, it may usher in a new era for privately built broadband.

Compared to many countries, the United States has slow and patchy Internet service. While a few areas enjoy very fast service, overall the United States ranks 24th worldwide in speed, with consumers receiving an average of 11.6-megabits-per-second download speeds.

An affordable service that is nearly two orders of magnitude faster began in one neighborhood in Kansas City last Tuesday.

In planning the deployment, Google carved the metropolis into 202 neighborhoods, and asked interested residents and businesses to pay $10 to pre-register for the service. Once a critical mass did so — ranging from 5-25% per neighborhood (Google calls them fiberhoods), depending on the population density — Google went ahead with the street-level installation. If people reneged on their pledge to subscribe, they’d lose the $10.

The actual service is a bargain compared to many services that provide much slower speeds. Google’s gigabit Internet service is priced at $70 per month. When bundled with TV, the price rises to $120 — and Google is certainly pushing that additional service. Users subscribing for a TV service get a two-terabyte storage box for recorded shows and a Nexus 7 Android tablet to use as a remote control. (As a budget alternative, Internet at five megabits per second is available for a one-time fee of $300.)

While some people who preregistered have expressed irritation at having to wait in line, so far it seems to be working, says Jenna Wandres, a spokeswoman for Google Fiber. “We’re pleased with how many people in Hanover Heights have fiber,” she says, referring to the neighborhood that got the service on Tuesday.

Some industry veterans have expressed skepticism that Google can make the installation economics work, with some saying that it can cost between $850 and $1,250 per customer to get fiber installed— far more than the one-time fee of $300 that Google is charging for basic service.

While Google won’t disclose any numbers about costs or numbers of subscribers, Wandres insists that the strategy is economical. “This is not a beta program or an experiment. Efficiency is a huge focus for us as we build out Kansas City. And efficiency can cut costs,” she says.

The entry of superfast Internet may aid local entrepreneurship. An effort called Homes for Hackers is trying to get Kansas City homeowners with Google Fiber service to give free rooms to developers for three months, and a collection of local startups is betting the service will attract new companies.

W. Russell Neuman, professor of media technology at the University of Michigan, says Google’s effort is certainly novel, but that it is an open question whether it could change the economics of Internet service overnight. “Laying fiber is so far out of the scope of what Google normally does. But does Google know something that Verizon doesn’t know?” He says.

Major telecoms like AT&T and Verizon are taking a different path. They’ve focused on upgrading service in areas that they are already providing with wireline DSL service. Verizon has built out a fiber optic network over the past eight years — a $23 billion investment that has made the new service, called FiOS, available to 18 million U.S. households. And then it went about trying to sell the service plans. “Our business model does not call for FiOS to be built out into areas where we have not historically provided wireline service,” says Bill Kula, a Verizon spokesman.

The approach of those two giants has made high-speed Internet available to millions. (In Verizon’s case, the company generally charges $99 per month with a two-year contract for service of up to 300 megabits per second for downloads and 65 megabits per second for uploads). But it hasn’t extended the reach of the network. “Google Fiber is the most niche community approach that has been taken to date, but it remains to be seen how sustainable that approach is,” Kula says. “The question also is whether there will be a consumer demand and need for such speeds.”

Another route to juicing Internet speeds to gigabit-per-second levels is government investment. Chattanooga, Tenn., received such a boost when the local power utility got a $111 million U.S. Department of Energy grant as part of federal stimulus efforts that built out the city’s smart grid.

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/11/19/google-fiber-us-internet/

How to Detect Apps Leaking Your Data

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One reason that smartphones and smartphone apps are so useful is that they can integrate intimately with our personal lives. But that also puts our personal data at risk.

A new service called Mobilescope hopes to change that by letting a smartphone user examine all the data that apps transfer, and alerting him when sensitive information, such as his name or email address, is transferred.

“It’s a platform-agnostic interception tool that you can use on your Android, iOS, Blackberry, or Windows device,” says Ashkan Soltani, an independent privacy researcher who created Mobilescope with fellow researchers David Campbell and Aldo Cortesi.

Their first proof-of-concept won a prize for the best app created during a privacy-focused programming contest, or codeathon, organized by the Wall Street Journal in April this year; the trio has now polished it enough to open a beta trial period. Access is steadily being rolled out to the “couple of thousand” people that have already signed up, says Soltani.

Once a person has signed up for the service, Mobilescope is accessed through a website, not as an app installed onto a device. A user can use the site to see logs of the data transferred by the apps on their device. They can also specify “canaries,” pieces of sensitive information such as a phone number, email or name that trigger an alert if they are sent out by an app.

Mobilescope can catch apps doing things such as copying a person’s address book to a remote server, as Path and several other mobile apps were found to do earlier this year. Soltani says the service is intended to level the playing field between mobile apps and the people that use them by arming users with more information about what those apps do.

As became clear when several popular apps were caught quietly copying contact data from users earlier this year, neither Apple’s nor Google’s mobile operating systems currently offer people much insight into or control of what apps are sharing.

(MIT Technology Review)

“Our focus is making really simple the process of interception,” says Soltani. “If you’re not an advanced user, you can still get at this data using Mobilescope.”

When a person signs up for Mobilescope, a configuration file is sent to his device. Once installed, this file causes all future Internet traffic to be routed through a Mobilescope server so that it can analyze the data that comes and goes to the device and its apps.

That arrangement is possible thanks to the way that smartphones are designed to be compatible with VPNs, or virtual private networks — encrypted communications that some businesses use to keep corporate data private. That design doesn’t add much delay to a person’s connection, says Soltani, in part because users are connected with a server as geographically close to them as possible.

Mobilescope can even examine data that is sent over the most common types of secure connection used by apps, similar to those used by banking websites, by intercepting the certificates involved. The service cannot decrypt other data, but Soltani says that few apps bother to use encryption. Data collected by Mobilescope is discarded after each session of use, and is only ever stored on a person’s own device.

Soltani says he doesn’t imagine Mobilescope will have the mass appeal of something like Angry Birds, but he hopes it will encourage journalists, activists, and ordinary smartphone owners to look into what apps do, and will help put more pressure on app developers to respect privacy.

“Added transparency for everyone — app developers, users, regulators — will help the whole mobile ecosystem.”

An earlier version of Mobilescope gave users the power to send fake data to certain apps, for example sending a spoof location. “We had to pull that out because the ecosystem is not ready for it,” says Soltani, who says this broke some apps, sometimes in ways that could harm other users. A separate project does make that tactic available to Android users willing to use a modified version of their operating system.

(MIT Technology Review)

In April, Xuxian Jiang, an associate professor at North Carolina State University, published a study showing that the ad systems included in many Android apps endanger users’ privacy. Around half of these systems monitor a user’s GPS location, and some also collect call logs and other sensitive data.

Jiang, who has uncovered other security and privacy flaws with mobile apps, said Mobilescope will be an “interesting” new tool for keeping tabs on apps. However, he adds that it can’t be guaranteed to catch everything, and says mobile privacy can only be improved with greater transparency from developers, improved privacy statements, and action from the creators of mobile operating systems.

“[We] need of mechanisms for users to actually control apps’ access to various personal information,” he says.

Justin Brookman, who directs consumer privacy activity at the Center for Democracy and Technology, says this will require changes to the law, which currently simply encourages companies to write very broad privacy policies to avoid the penalties for writing false ones.

“Detailed disclosures are actually deterred by the law,” he says. The CDT is attempting to get legislation introduced that instead requires companies to explicitly tell consumers what’s happening to their data, and to provide them with more control over it.

This article originally published at MIT Technology Review
here

Read more: http://mashable.com/2012/08/10/detect-apps-leaking-data/